Open Educational Resources

/ Contribute Content
Displaying 101 of 131 results
Rating | Views Title Posted Date Contributor Common Core Standards Grade Levels Resource Type

25 billion apps - Dan Meyer Three Act Task

CC_BY-NC-SA

The question is simple: When should you start bombarding the App Store with purchases if you want to win a $10,000 App Store Gift card? The lesson hooks students immediately with the initial video clip of a “live” counter of current downloads showing the number approaching 25,000,000,000. The mathematics deals with modeling a linear relationship between two quantities

9/7/2014 Trey Cox
8.F.B.4 8.F.A.3 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 8 Video

Number Systems - Place Value

CC_BY-NC-SA

Exploring different number bases may not only help you if you are needing in some particular application (like computers or electronics), but also in helping you make sense of the number system with which you are most familiar – the base 10 number system.

9/6/2014 Trey Cox
5.NBT.A.1 5.NBT.A.2 5.NBT.A.3 5.NBT.A.4 3.NBT.A.1 3.NBT.A.2 4.NBT.A.1 4.NBT.A.2 4.NBT.A.3 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 3 4 5 6 7 8 Activity

Sugar Packets - Dan Meyer Three Act Task

CC_BY-NC-SA

The question is simple: How many sugar packets are in a soda bottle? The lesson hooks students immediately with the initial video clip of a man sitting in a restaurant downing packets of sugar one-after-another! The mathematics involved is proportional reasoning.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
6.RP.A.3 6.RP.A.3a 6.RP.A.3b 6.RP.A.3d 7.RP.A.2 7.RP.A.2a 7.RP.A.2b MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 6 7 Video

Directed Distance - An Introduction to "Graph"

CC_BY-NC-SA

This annotated lesson can be used to introduce directed distance and the concept of graph. It can be used as the very first experience students have with graphs, as a review, and/or as an introduction to “circular” coordinates (you can choose to never refer to them as polar coordinates). It is highly interactive and connects the concepts of “new” graphing systems to rectangular coordinates. Initially, there is a brief history given and review of the Cartesian rectangular coordinate system.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
5.G.A.2 6.G.A.3 5.OA.B.3 6.NS.C.8 7.RP.A.2d 8.EE.C.8a 8.F.A.1 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 MP.7 5 6 7 8 Activity

Proportional Relationships of Triangles - An Activity

CC_BY-NC-SA

This is a two-part activity and will most likely take two 50 - 55 minute class periods – one day per part. Part I (Day one) is a hands-on activity that allows students to work together on computers to discover the proportional relationship between a pair of similar right triangles. Ideally, you will have a class set of computers or a computer lab you could use for this lesson. If you don't have access to these resources you can run a demonstration on one computer and project it for the class and have students come up to manipulate the triangles.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
8.G.B.7 HSG-SRT.A.2 HSG-SRT.B.5 HSG-SRT.C.8 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 8 HS Activity

Powers of Ten - Number Sense

CC_BY-NC-SA

Students (and adults) have a difficult time trying to grasp very large (and very small) numbers. This activity uses an interesting context (astronomical objects0 to stimulate their interest in modeling enormous distances in a way that can help them understand relative distances. Students naturally arrive at the need for a different kind of number scale than linear and arrive at a "power of ten" (logarithmic) scale. The lesson includes an extension for advanced students ready to begin to investigate logarithms.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
5.NBT.A.2 6.EE.A.1 8.EE.A.1 8.EE.A.3 HSF-BF.B.5 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 MP.7 MP.8 5 6 7 8 HS Activity

Flintstone's Writing Project - Sampling

CC_BY-NC-SA

This writing project was written as a letter from Fred Flintstone to the students asking for their advice on proper sampling techniques that requires their mathematical “expertise”. This clearly defines the target audience for the paper and gives the students an idea of the mathematical background that they should assume of the reader. The plot lines in the project is a little bit goofy, although not imprecise, which helps relax the students and gives them the opportunity to be creative when writing their papers.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

A Bug's Life - Estimating Area of Irregular Polygons

CC_BY-NC-SA

This is a creative writing project that includes a rubric for scoring student's work. It works well as a team project. The focus of the project is on solving a contextual problems involving area of a two-dimensional object composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
7.G.B.6 6.G.A.1 MP.1 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

Valentine Marbles

CC_BY-NC-SA

For this task, Minitab software was used to generate 100 random samples of size 16 from a population where the probability of obtaining a success in one draw is 33.6% (Bernoulli). Given that multiple samples of the same size have been generated, students should note that there can be quite a bit of variability among the estimates from random samples and that on average, the center of the distribution of such estimates is at the actual population value and most of the estimates themselves tend to cluster around the actual population value. Although formal inference is not covered in Grade 7 standards, students may develop a sense that the results of the 100 simulations tell them what sample proportions would be expected for a sample of size 16 from a population with about successes.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

Sampling Reese’s Pieces

CC_BY-NC-SA

This activity uses simulation to help students understand sampling variability and reason about whether a particular sample result is unusual, given a particular hypothesis. By using first candies, a web applet, then a calculator, and varying sample size, students learn that larger samples give more stable and better estimates of a population parameter and develop an appreciation for factors affecting sampling variability.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

The Forest Problem

CC_BY-NC-SA

Students want to know why they would ever use a sampling method other than a simple random sample. This lesson visually illustrates the effect of using a simple random sample (SRS) vs. a stratified random sample. Students will create a SRS from a population of apple trees and use the mean of the SRS to estimate the mean yield of the trees. Students will then create a stratified random sample from the same population to again estimate the yield of the trees. The use of the stratified random sample is to control for a known source of variation in the yield of the crop, a nearby forest.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
6.SP.A.1 6.SP.B.4 6.SP.B.5 7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 MP.7 6 7 Activity

Why do we need MAD?

CC_BY-NC-SA

Students will wonder why we need to have a value that describes the spread of the data beyond the range. If we give them three sets of data that have the same mean, median, and range and yet are clearly differently shaped then perhaps they will see that the MAD has some use.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
6.SP.A.3 6.SP.B.4 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.7 6 Activity

Who’s the Best Home Run Hitter of All time?

CC_BY-NC-SA

This lesson requires students to use side-by-side box plots to make a claim as to who is the "best home run hitter of all time" for major league baseball.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
6.SP.B.4 6.SP.B.5 6.SP.B.5a 6.SP.B.5b 6.SP.B.5c 6.SP.B.5d 6.SP.A.3 6.SP.A.2 7.SP.B.3 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.7 6 7 Activity