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Rating | Views Title Posted Date Contributor Common Core Standards Grade Levels Resource Type

Estimating the Mean

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Goal: The goal of this activity is for students to randomly draw words from an excerpt to estimate the mean length word count of the entire document. 

4/20/2017 Ashley Nicoloff
7.SP.A.2 7.SP.A.1 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.6 MP.7 MP.8 5 6 7 8 HS Activity

M & M Variablility

CC_BY-NC-SA

9/23/2016 Ashley Nicoloff
6.SP.B.4 6.SP.B.5 6.SP.B.5a 7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.6 MP.8 6 7 Activity

Yellow Starburst - Dan Meyer Three Act Task

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This lesson is designed to introduce students to probability using Dan Meyer's three-act-task, Yellow Starburst. After viewing a brief introductory video clip, students are asked to determine how many Starburst packs have exactly one yellow Starburst and how many packs will have exactly two yellow Starbursts.

9/24/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.2 7.SP.C.6 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 7 Activity

Flintstone's Writing Project - Sampling

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This writing project was written as a letter from Fred Flintstone to the students asking for their advice on proper sampling techniques that requires their mathematical “expertise”. This clearly defines the target audience for the paper and gives the students an idea of the mathematical background that they should assume of the reader. The plot lines in the project is a little bit goofy, although not imprecise, which helps relax the students and gives them the opportunity to be creative when writing their papers.

9/5/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

Valentine Marbles

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For this task, Minitab software was used to generate 100 random samples of size 16 from a population where the probability of obtaining a success in one draw is 33.6% (Bernoulli). Given that multiple samples of the same size have been generated, students should note that there can be quite a bit of variability among the estimates from random samples and that on average, the center of the distribution of such estimates is at the actual population value and most of the estimates themselves tend to cluster around the actual population value. Although formal inference is not covered in Grade 7 standards, students may develop a sense that the results of the 100 simulations tell them what sample proportions would be expected for a sample of size 16 from a population with about successes.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

Sampling Reese’s Pieces

CC_BY-NC-SA

This activity uses simulation to help students understand sampling variability and reason about whether a particular sample result is unusual, given a particular hypothesis. By using first candies, a web applet, then a calculator, and varying sample size, students learn that larger samples give more stable and better estimates of a population parameter and develop an appreciation for factors affecting sampling variability.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 7 Activity

The Forest Problem

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Students want to know why they would ever use a sampling method other than a simple random sample. This lesson visually illustrates the effect of using a simple random sample (SRS) vs. a stratified random sample. Students will create a SRS from a population of apple trees and use the mean of the SRS to estimate the mean yield of the trees. Students will then create a stratified random sample from the same population to again estimate the yield of the trees. The use of the stratified random sample is to control for a known source of variation in the yield of the crop, a nearby forest.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
6.SP.A.1 6.SP.B.4 6.SP.B.5 7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.2 MP.3 MP.4 MP.5 MP.6 MP.7 6 7 Activity

SRS vs. Convenience Sample in the Gettysburg Address

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Students have an interesting view of what a random sample looks like. They often feel that just closing their eyes and picking “haphazardly” will be enough to achieve randomness. This lesson should remove this misconception. Students will be allowed to pick words with their personal definition of random and then forced to pick a true simple random sample and compare the results.

9/4/2014 Trey Cox
6.SP.A.1 6.SP.B.4 6.SP.B.5 7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.1 MP.4 MP.5 6 7 Activity

Capture-Recapture

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Imagine that a city employee is given the task of counting the number of fish in a city pond in a park. The “capture-recapture” method may be used to approximate the number of fish in the pond. The employee could capture a number of fish, say 20, and tag them and release them back into the pond. Waiting until the fish have a chance to become mixed with the other fish in the pond, the employee can capture more fish. If the number of fish captured is 25 and 4 of them are tagged, we can use proportional reasoning to estimate the number of fish in the pond.

3/28/2014 Scott Adamson
7.RP.A.2 7.RP.A.2a 7.RP.A.2b 7.RP.A.2c 7.RP.A.3 7.SP.A.1 7.SP.A.2 MP.4 8 7 6 Activity